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2018 Johns Hopkins Men's Lacrosse Preview - Attack

Feb. 7, 2018


BALTIMORE, MD – In the first of a three-part series breaking down the 2018 Johns Hopkins men’s lacrosse team, HopkinsSports.com takes a look at the Blue Jay attack, which returns two of three starters from last season.

Stanwick, Marr Return to Pace Attack: Senior Shack Stanwick is back for his fourth season in the starting lineup, while junior Kyle Marr returns after enjoying a breakout sophomore season in 2017. They finished first and second, respectively, on the team in goals, assists and points last season and give head coach Dave Pietramala a talented, experienced pair to build the offense around.

Stanwick counts 74 goals and 82 assists to his credit in three seasons and will carry a 48-game point-scoring streak into the season. He is just six goals shy of becoming the eighth player in school history to amass 80 goals and 80 assists and his 48-game point-scoring run is the third-longest active streak in the nation and just eight games shy of Terry Riordan’s school record of 56.

A two-time Honorable Mention USILA All-American and a two-time All-Big Ten selection, Stanwick has great vision and is an effective finisher around the goal (.451 career shooting percentage). With the loss of several key parts of the Blue Jay offense from last season, Stanwick’s ability to get many of the younger players involved will be a key to the team’s success this season.

Marr became the latest sharp-shooting attackman to burst on the scene as a sophomore for the Blue Jays as he totaled 25 goals and 20 assists a year ago. After notching a productive 13 goals and three assists as a freshman, he followed recent JHU attackmen Brandon Benn and Ryan Brown, who also established themselves as sophomores.

Marr’s ability to stretch the defense from the wing opens things up inside for the Blue Jays and he is a tremendous feeder from the top on extra-man; he notched a team-high 12 extra-man assists last season and is adept at looking through the defense to find an open teammate.

Smith, Williams, Fox Battling for Open Spot: While Stanwick and Marr are the knowns, there is no shortage of other talented players looking for increased roles on attack.

Sophomores Forry Smith and Cole Williams both played in 15 games as freshmen last season and combined for 20 goals and 10 assists despite not starting. As noted, attackmen at Johns Hopkins have often emerged as sophomores and Smith and Williams could add their names to this growing list.

Smith finished fifth on the team in scoring with 14 goals and six assists for 20 points; all three of those totals were the most among non-starters and an increase in production will likely come as his playing time increases.

Williams totaled six goals and four assists last season and, at 6-5, 210 pounds, presents the most difficult matchup for the opposition. His ability to get to the goal or draw slides and move the ball quickly will have a big impact on the effectiveness of the Blue Jay offense.

Junior Jake Fox enjoyed a strong fall and preseason and could be poised for a breakout season of his own. He is effective in tight areas and could hold down the spot in the middle of the Blue Jay extra-man unit. Fox has good size and would change the way the opposition defends the Blue Jays.

Sophomore Joe Pollard also returns after playing in six games a year ago, while newcomers Brett Baskin, Jack Keogh and Luke Shilling all bring impressive credentials and varied skill sets; each flashed the ability to contribute in the fall and preseason.

Johns Hopkins averaged 11.6 goals per game in 2017 to mark the fifth straight year that Johns Hopkins has averaged at least 11.5 goals per outing. The Blue Jays also led the nation and set a school record by converting on 60.5% of their extra-man chances last season. With Stanwick and Marr leading the way and a number of different options to choose from on attack, the Blue Jay offense could be just as effective in 2018.

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