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Johns Hopkins to Induct Nine Into Athletic Hall of Fame

 

April 24, 2009

BALTIMORE, MD -- Johns Hopkins University will induct nine new members into its Athletic Hall of Fame in ceremonies scheduled for Saturday, May 2. The nine-member class is the 15th to be inducted since the Johns Hopkins Athletic Hall of Fame was formed in 1994 and raises the total number of members in the Hall of Fame to 114. The group will be honored at the Johns Hopkins-Loyola men's lacrosse game on Saturday afternoon (game time is 1 pm) with the actual induction ceremony to take place in the Bloomberg Center on the Johns Hopkins campus later that evening.

Individuals interested in attending the Johns Hopkins Athletic Hall of Fame induction ceremonies can contact Amanda Kennedy in the Blue Jays Unlimited office to secure a reservation. Kennedy can be reached by phone (410/516-6132) or email (kennedya@jhu.edu).

Below is a short profile of each of the seven inductees.

Julie Anderson
Women's Basketball
Unionville, PA/Unionville HS

The all-time leading scorer and rebounder in Johns Hopkins women's basketball history, Julie Anderson ranks as one of the most decorated players in the storied history of the program. She garnered All-America honors three times in her career, including first team status as a senior. She remains the only First Team All-American and only three-time All-American in program history.
Anderson teamed with fellow 2009 Johns Hopkins Athletic Hall of Fame inductee Angie Arnold to lead the Blue Jays to a four-year run that is unmatched in the annals of Blue Jay basketball. Johns Hopkins posted a 91-25 (.784) record from 1994-98 with four trips to the NCAA Tournament and the 1996 Centennial Conference Championship. The Blue Jays advanced to the Elite Eight in 1997 and 1998 and the Sweet 16 in 1995.
Anderson's marks in the Johns Hopkins record book are as widespread as they are impressive. In addition to her school-record 1,944 points and 1,376 rebounds, she also holds JHU records for career field goals made (748), free throw attempts (671) and career double-doubles (79). She also ranks among the top five in school history in field goal attempts (1,623 / 2nd), field goal percentage (.461 / 5th), free throws made (434 / 2nd) and blocked shots (105 / 3rd). She is the only player in school history with more than 1,500 points and 1,300 rebounds and co-holds the school record for career games played (116).
The cumulative total of Anderson's career is due in large part to the consistency she displayed throughout her career. She holds the top three single-season scoring totals and three of the top four single-season rebounding totals.
The 1997 Centennial Conference Player of the Year and a three-time First Team All-Centennial selection, Anderson's mark was left on more than just the Johns Hopkins record book. Her 79 career double-doubles are 15 more than any other player in NCAA Division III Women's Basketball history and her single-season totals of 25 (1996-97) and 24 (1997-98) double-doubles are the top two totals in Division III history as well.

Angie Arnold
Women's Basketball
Lancaster, PA/Lancaster Catholic HS

Arguably the best guard to ever play women's basketball at Johns Hopins, Angie Arnold combined excellence on the court and in the classroom during a four-year career that is rivaled by few anywhere in the history of Division III Women's Basketball.
Arnold twice earned All-America honors, was selected as the 1998 Centennial Conference Player of the Year and was the 1997-98 recipient of the Frances Pomeroy Naismith Award as the nation's top women's basketball player in the nation (all divisions) under 5-foot-6. Not to be outdone in the classroom, she also earned an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship and remains one of just two players in program history to earn this prestigious award.
The only player in school history with 1,500 points, 500 assists and 200 steals, Arnold holds school records for assists (570), field goal attempts (1,652), three-point field goals made (121), free throws made (460) and minutes played (3,923). She also ranks in the top five in school history in games played (116 / T1st), field goals made (611), three-point field goal attempts (386 / 3rd), free throw attempts (609 / 2nd), free throw percentage (.755 / 7th) and steals (237/ 4th). In addition, she ranks second in career scoring (1,803).
The consummate team player, Arnold holds three of the top seven single-season point totals in school history while also holding the top three single-season assist totals as well.
Arnold teamed with fellow 2009 Johns Hopkins Athletic Hall of Fame inductee Julie Anderson to lead the Blue Jays to a four-year run that is unmatched in the annals of Blue Jay basketball. Johns Hopkins posted a 91-25 (.784) record from 1994-98 with four trips to the NCAA Tournament and the 1996 Centennial Conference Championship. The Blue Jays advanced to the Elite Eight in 1997 and 1998 and the Sweet 16 in 1995.

Francine Brennan
Lacrosse • Field Hockey
Allenhurst, NJ/Miss Porter's School (Farmington, CT)

Few female athletes in Johns Hopkins history have enjoyed a better two-sport career than Francine Brennan. Brennan was a standout attacker in lacrosse and anchored the Blue Jay defense in field hockey as one of the finest goalies in school history.
The women's lacrosse team was a fixture on the national scene during Brennan's career as she helped the Blue Jays to a four-year record of 55-12 and trips to the NCAA Semifinals as a freshman, sophomore and junior. Johns Hopkins also won the first two Centennial Conference titles in league history (1994 and 1995) during Brennan's career. The 55 wins Brennan and the Blue Jays won from 1993-96 remain the most in a four-year period in school history.
One of the most versatile players in JHU women's lacrosse history, Brennan totaled 140 goals and 120 assists during her career and finished as JHU's all-time leader in assists while ranking second in points and fifth in goals. She was the first player in school history to amass 120 or more goals and assists and remains one of just two players in program history to reach these marks.
Brennan twice earned All-America honors, including first team status as a senior, when she was also named the Centennial Conference Player of the Year. She earned Second Team All-Centennial as a sophomore before moving up to the first team in each of her last two years.
While scoring came naturally in lacrosse, Brennan was equally adept at keeping opponents off the board for the field hockey team in the fall. She graduated as JHU's career leader in saves (572) and holds the top two single-season save totals in school history (210 in 1995 and 206 in 1994). A two-time All-Centennial selection, she also earned Second Team All-Region honors as a senior.
In field hockey, Brennan helped guide JHU to a 39-20-2 record with two trips to the NCAA Tournament (1992 and 1993) and one Centennial Conference Championship (1993).

Matt Johnson
Men's Swimming
Northbrook, IL/Glenbrook North HS

Putting Matt Johnson's career in perspective is pretty simple; the numbers speak for themselves. Simple? Yes. Stunning? Even more so!
The NCAA began sponsoring the NCAA Division III Men's Swimming Championships in 1975. Since then there have been exactly six individuals who have won a national championship in the same event four times. Matt Johnson was just the third person to turn this trick when he grabbed the national title in the 100 fly in 1995, 1996, 1997 and 1998. How difficult is this? Seven years have passed since anyone has won an event four times.
The individual championships in the 100 fly were part of a national legacy Johnson carved during his career at Homewood. He qualified for the maximum allowed seven events at the NCAA Championships in each of his four years and earned All-America honors a school-record 27 times in those 28 events. In addition to his four individual titles, he placed in the top five at the NCAAs in 17 other events (four individual and 13 relays). With Johnson anchoring the team, Johns Hopkins placed in the top six at the NCAAs in each of his four years with fifth, fourth, sixth and sixth-place finishes during his career.
One of the top butterfly specialists in Division III history, Johnson graduated with the top seven times in school history in the 100 fly and the top four times in school history in the 200 fly.
In addition to his exploits at the NCAAs, he also won a combined 14 UAA relay and individual titles during his career and helped the Blue Jays win four straight UAA team titles.
Johnson's exploits were not limited to the pool. As a senior in 1998 he became the seventh Johns Hopkins men's swimmer to earn a prestigious NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship.

Kristie Kantowski
Women's Basketball
Ellicott City, MD/Glenelg HS

The transformation of the Johns Hopkins women's basketball program into a nationally-known and respected program took place in the late 1980s/early 1990s. At the center of that transformation was Kristie Kantowski, who helped guide Johns Hopkins to a 55-26 (.604) record and two trips to the Middle Atlantic Conference Playoffs. The playoff appearances were the first in the history of the program and the 55 wins were the most (by far) in a four-year period in school history to that point.
Kantowski finished her career with totals of 1,060 points, 510 rebounds and 69 blocked shots. She ranked third all-time in scoring, second in rebounds and third blocks when she concluded her career and still ranks among the top 10 in school history in all three categories. Kantowski also finished third in school history in career field goal percentage (.455) and still ranks eighth all-time.
A First Team All-MAC Southwest selection as a junior and senior, Kantowski became just the second player in school history to score over 1,000 points and grab over 500 rebounds. Nearly 20 years after her career ended, she remains one of just six players in program history to reach this milestone.

Quint Kessenich
Men's Lacrosse
Lynbrook, NY/Lynbrook HS

Thrust into the role as the starting goalie on the Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team midway through his freshman year, Quint Kessenich never budged from that spot during the remainder of his career and enjoyed a four-year run rivaled by few goalies in the storied history of the program.
Kessenich fueled a late-season run for Johns Hopkins in 1987 that landed the Blue Jays their seventh NCAA Championship. He helped lead Johns Hopkins to a four-year record of 36-12 (.750), the 1987 NCAA title, an appearance in the 1989 NCAA Championship game and four trips to the NCAA Tournament. Included in the run to the 1987 national championship was a 13-8 win over top-ranked and previously undefeated Maryland in the NCAA Semifinals. Kessenich was named to the 1987 NCAA All-Tournament Team.
Kessenich, who ended his career ranked first in school history in career saves (573) and held 24 of the 31 opponents he started against to less than 10 goals, earned All-America honors four times in his career, including first team status as a sophomore and junior. He earned the Kelly Award as the nation's top goalie in 1988 and 1989 and remains one of just 20 players in school history to earn All-America honors four times. He is the only goalie among the 20 players who have earned All-America honors four times at JHU.
One of just four Johns Hopkins goalies to win the Kelly Award more than once, Kessenich was named to the All-Time Johns Hopkins Team at the end of his career and his .6289 career save percentage ranks second in school history.

Scott Orlovsky
Baseball
Clifton, NJ/Clifton HS

Scott Orlovsky arrived at Johns Hopkins in the fall of 1994. Over the next four years, he proceeded to rewrite the Blue Jay pitching record book while helping JHU to one of the finest four-year runs in school history.
A dominant right-hander, Orlovsky tied the Johns Hopkins record for career wins (29) and logged a remarkable 29-3 (.906) record. His winning percentage was, at the time, a Blue Jay record. He still holds school records for longest winning streak (19 games) and innings pitched (260.2) and ranks among the top 15 in school history in strikeouts (160), complete games (17) and games started (36).
Fueling Orlovsky's career marks was perhaps the greatest two-year run by a pitcher in school history. He combined to go 21-2 in 1997 and 1998 and remains the only pitcher in school history to twice win 10 or more games in a season (10 in 1997 and 11 in 1998).
For his efforts, Orlovsky twice earned Centennial Conference Pitcher of the Year honors (1997 & 1998) and he was a First Team All-Centennial, First Team All-ECAC South and First Team ABCA All-Region selection in each of those years as well. He capped his career with a selection as a Third Team ABCA All-American in 1998.
Orlovsky's exploits on the mound helped Johns Hopkins to a four-year record of 117-45-1 (.721), two Centennial Conference Championships, one UAA title and two trips to the NCAA Tournament. The 1998 team posted a stunning 36-4 record, was ranked as high as number four in the nation and earned the top seed in the NCAA Mid.-Atlantic Regional.

Jenn Ward
Women's Lacrosse
Wilton, CT/Wilton

One of the truly explosive offensive players in the storied history of the Johns Hopkins women's lacrosse program, Jenn Ward enjoyed a career matched by few in the history of the program. Her individual accomplishments helped the Blue Jays establish themselves as a player on the national level.
One of the most prolific scorers in the history of Division III women's lacrosse, Ward totaled school records of 209 goals and 290 points during her career. She also graduated ranked third all-time in assists (81). Her 209 goals and 290 points still rank second in school history and were the most-ever by a player when the Blue Jays competed at the Division III level.
Ward's career totals were crafted on the strength of three of the finest seasons in school history. She totaled 60 goals and 25 assists for 85 points as a sophomore in 1994, when the Blue Jays posted a 16-1 record and advanced to the NCAA Semifinals. She led the team back to the NCAA Semifinals for the third straight year in 1995, when she scored 68 goals and added 31 assists for a then school-record 99 points. She capped her career with 50 goals and 21 assists in 1996 to become the first player in school history to record three 50-goal seasons.
Ward's exploits were well-known nationally as she garnered All-America honors in each of her final three seasons, including first team honors as a sophomore. She earned First Team All-Centennial honors three times and helped lead the Blue Jays to a pair of Centennial Conference Championships and a four-year record of 55-12. The 55 wins amassed during her career remain the most in any four-year period in school history.

Franz Wittelsberger
Men's Lacrosse
Baltimore, MD/Calvert Hall

One of the finest and most prolific attackmen in the storied history of the Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse program, Franz Wittelsberger concluded his career in 1976 ranked among the Blue Jays' all-time leaders in every scoring category and as one of the program's most decorated players. More than 30 years later and his place in the Blue Jay record book remains nearly identical.
Wittelsberger graduated with a school-record 151 goals to his credit, a mark that would stand unchallenged until 1995, when it was finally surpassed. He also ranked second in career points (220) and sixth in assists (69) when he finished his career and still ranks fifth in points and 14th in assists. He also currently ranks third in goals.
The leading goal-scorer on JHU's first NCAA Champoinship team in 1974 (45) and still one of just two players in school history to score 40 or more goals in three different seasons, Wittelsberger earned All-America honors four times in his career, including first team honors as a junior, second team honors as a freshman and sophomore and third team honors as a senior. He remains one of just 20 players in school history who has earned All-America honors four times.
In addition to the 1974 NCAA Championship, Wittelsberger helped Johns Hopkins to a national runner-up finish in 1973 and a trip to the NCAA Semifinals as a senior. Hopkins qualified for the NCAA Tournament in each of his four seasons and it was in the NCAAs that Wittelsberger did some of his finest work. He scored 25 goals and added 10 assists in nine career NCAA Tournament games. His 25 career goals scored in the NCAAs remained a JHU record for 32 years and the seven goals and eight points he totaled in the 1974 NCAA Quarterfinals remain JHU NCAA Tournament records.

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